College

For everyone who is in college

What to do if you are starting college in the spring semester

College photo

Most college freshmen begin their classes in the fall semester that immediately follows their high school graduation. But in some cases, maybe after a deferral from their top-choice school or when they take extra time off from studying after high school, new college students wait until the spring to start.

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5 facts about today’s college graduates

Graduation season is in full swing, but what do we really know about all those fresh-faced young adults in black robes — what they actually studied, what their chances are of landing a decent job, how they’ll look back on their college years? Here’s our data roundup:

CollegeGrads_11 Only about 56% of students earn degrees within six years. The National Student Clearinghouse, a nonprofit verification and research organization, tracked 2.4 million first-time college students who enrolled in fall 2007 with the intent of pursuing a degree or certificate. The completion rate was highest (72.9%) among students who started at four-year, private, nonprofit schools, and lowest (39.9%) among those who started at two-year public institutions.

2 Business is still the most common major. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, about a fifth (20.5%) of the 1.79 million bachelor’s degrees conferred in 2011-12 were in business. Business has been the single most common major since 1980-81; before that, education led the way. The least common bachelor’s degrees, according to the NCES, were in library science (95 conferred in 2011-12), military technologies and applied sciences (86) and precision production (37).

CollegeGrads_23 It’s harder for new graduates to find good jobs. It’s no secret that unemployment among recent grads remains higher than it was before the Great Recession. But in a recent report, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York went deeper and looked at underemployment among recent grads (defined as people aged 22 to 27 with at least a bachelor’s degree). The Fed researchers used data from the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics to examine whether employed grads were in jobs that typically required a college degree, what those jobs paid, and whether they were working full- or part-time. They found that in 2012, about 44% of grads were working in jobs that didn’t require a college degree — a rate that, while about what it was in early 1990s, increased after the 2001 and 2007-09 recessions. Only 36% of that group were in what the researchers called “good non-college jobs” — those paying around $45,000 a year — down from around half in the 1990s. The share of underemployed recent grads in low-wage (below $25,000) jobs rose from about 15% in 1990 to more than 20%. About one-in-five (23%) underemployed recent grads were working part-time in 2011, up from 15% in 2000.

4 But graduates still out-earn people without degrees. A Pew Research Center report from earlier this year looked at earnings of Millennials (those born after 1980) who usually worked full-time in 2012. Among that group, workers with at least a bachelor’s degree had median annual earnings of $45,500, well over the medians for people with only some college ($30,000) or a high-school diploma ($28,000). The gap has widened over the years and across the generations: In 1965, when the members of the Silent Generation were 25 to 34 years old, median earnings for high-school graduates were 81% of those for college graduates; in 2013, among the Millennials, it was 61.5%.

5 Most grads think college was worth it. The same Pew Researchreport found that majorities of graduates in all three of the largest U.S. generations — Boomers, Gen-Xers and Millennials — agree that college either has paid off or will pay off, given what they and their families invested in it. Perhaps not surprisingly, the highest-earning graduates were the most positive about their educations — 98% of those making six figures and up said their degree had paid off, compared with 63% of graduates earning less than $50,000. Similarly, people with advanced degrees were even more likely than bachelor’s and associate’s degree holders to say their education was worth the investment — 96%, compared with 89% and 76%, respectively.

This article, 5 Facts About Today’s College Graduates, was originally posted here .

Photo is from here.

Careers in Beauty Marketing: Information and Education Requirements

Learn about the education and preparation needed to become a beauty marketer. Get a quick view of the requirements as well as details about schooling, job duties and salary to find out if this is the career for you.

 

How To Be Beautiful

ssential Information

Beauty marketers create promotion strategies for advertising products such as lotions, potions, sprays and creams. A bachelor’s degree and an internship or experience is usually necessary for these careers. Professionals must also understand the beauty and fashion industry.

Required Education Bachelor’s typically needed
Other Requirements Internship often required, understanding of the industry
Projected Job Growth (2012 – 2022)* 13% for all marketing managers
Median Salary (2013)* $123,220 annually for all marketing managers

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Beauty Marketing Career Information

Beauty marketing careers range from beauty store counter assistant to director of marketing. At its most basic level, marketing involves promoting a company’s beauty products, which can range from cosmetics to fragrances to hair care products. Marketing professionals work with other executives in sales, advertising, public relations and promotion to examine the demand for beauty products and find ways that the company can meet that demand.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the median annual salary for marketing managers, including those in the beauty industry, was $123,220 as of 2013 (http://www.bls.gov). The BLS projected that employment for this occupational group would grow by 13% from 2012 to 2022.

Career Possibilities

Some beauty marketers begin their careers by working in a retail store as a beauty adviser, counter representative or sales associate. Prospective beauty marketers learn what products appeal to customers and how to promote them. Other entry-level positions in beauty marketing include marketing or administrative assistant at a cosmetics or beauty company.

After several years of experience, or earning a bachelor’s degree, individuals can become a marketing manager, product manager or sales representative. Some professionals choose to focus on market research or promotions, or they may pursue careers in beauty product development. At this level, professionals execute the marketing plans developed by the executive leadership and assist with developing pricing and promotion strategies. Experienced beauty marketers help develop marketing plans and oversee their execution.

Education Requirements

To work as a cosmetics counter representative, job candidates may only need a high school education. Those with a degree may qualify for advanced positions as a marketing manager, account executive or vice president.

According to the BLS, those wishing to pursue a career in marketing should consider majoring in business administration with a focus on marketing. Courses in marketing, management, finance, accounting, economics, market research, consumer behavior, sales, advertising and communication can be useful in this career. Understanding the beauty and fashion industry is also important. Some education programs specifically focus on beauty marketing topics, including package design, beauty formulations, beauty trends and forecasting.

Experience is another important factor for landing a job in the industry. Prospects can apply for internships in the beauty industry, and the BLS indicated that many employers seek candidates who have completed internships.

This article, Careers in Beauty Marketing: Information and Education Requirments, was originally posted here.

Photo is from here.

10 Tips to Ace Freshman Year

start-a-biz-part-1

So you’ve seen The Social Network — that’s what college life is all about, right? Studying hard, inventing online social media platforms, evading the Winklevii. But wait, you’ve also seen Good Will Hunting, where those Harvard students are portrayed as living in an ivory tower, separate from the real world.

Perhaps you’ve talked with an uncle who claims college was “the best time of my life,” while a cynical older cousin described it as feeling like a “holding ground before real life begins.” No one would blame you at this point for being confused about what exactly the college experience is supposed to be — or for desperately wondering how to make the most of it.

The truth of the matter is that everyone’s experience is different. You might be on a sports team, getting up at 6 a.m. several times a week. Or you might be into theater, spending long weeks before opening night on stage in tights and full makeup. Some schools have campuses, others are more urban — and still others have mainly students who commute to class. Each school has its own personality and vibe.

This doesn’t mean there aren’t some general similarities across the board. College is a time to make lifelong friends, expand and deepen your knowledge, discover new interests and become independent. You will be going through this experience with thousands of other students across the country (and world!), but at the same time you’ll also be defining your own unique college experience. Keeping that dichotomy in mind, here are 10 of our most helpful tips to have the best experience possible.

1. Keep in touch with high school friends. Meeting new people is exciting. However, if you’ve got great friends, put in the effort to maintain regular contact. It’ll come in handy when you realize you’re 1,000 miles away from home, and it can keep you grounded while you’re trying new experiences. Plus, you can visit another campus when you want to get away for a bit and gain some perspective. You may just find one of your childhood friends is interested in the same career after college, and will make a great roommate (or connection) after graduation.

2. Remind yourself: It’s OK to be homesick. It happens to everyone. Maybe the first three days of school are all excitement, and then it hits you, or maybe it doesn’t sink in until you visit your family over Thanksgiving. Everyone’s got his or her own timetable for this, but remember: Everyone’s going through it! Reach out both to high school friends at other colleges and people you meet at school. You’ll find someone who understands.

3. Try something new. Always wanted to learn the drums? Do it. Or get involved in politics? Check out student government. While all schools are different, the one thing that is true for every college big and small is that there are opportunities there for everyone and everything. This is your chance to dabble in just about anything, so take advantage while you can.

4. Keep doing what you love. Sometimes the message “try new things” can get overblown — don’t forget that it’s OK to also stick with what you love. The new people surrounding you will have different strengths and backgrounds and are going to expand your relationship with that old activity you’ve been doing since you were 5.

5. Look for a mentor. Start by building up your courage and talking to your professors outside of class. Your mentor is someone who will write you a killer job recommendation in four years. They will also take a vested interest in who you are as a person, as well as a student. They’ll give you insight beyond school and influence your development. Ultimately, they’re someone who’s been in your shoes and has come out the other end. They know generally what you are going through and can give you that perspective that those your age can’t.

6. Sleep.

7. Form a study group. This is a great way to make friends, plus you learn more by pooling knowledge. Win win!

8. Do the work. Even if you go to lecture and get the teacher’s interpretation, don’t fail to do actually read Freud’s The Ego and the Id for yourself and form your own opinion. College is a time when your biggest job is to learn; unless you go on to graduate school, you’re not going to find that again!

9. Get off campus. You’ll quickly realize there’s a big world out there outside of campus. So get out there. It’s a great way to maintain perspective and immerse yourself in a different vibe than the one on campus.

10. Trust your instincts. You can’t take all of this advice at once! Try something new or do something old? Get sleep or go off campus? Ultimately, this is a time to listen to and trust yourself.

And perhaps most of all, don’t be too hard on yourself. Given that college is a time to explore, there will likely be points where you are feeling lost. Perhaps everyone around you might seem like they are doing just fine. Remember: You’re not alone. Chances are, if you reach out about your feelings, someone will respond.

As J.R.R. Tolkien said: “Not all who wander are lost.” College is just the time to begin wandering. Good luck on your journey!

This article, 10 Tips to Ace Freshman Year, was orginally posted here.

Photo is from here.

The Most Important Question of Your Life

silhouette of happy running woman with umbrella

Everybody wants what feels good. Everyone wants to live a carefree, happy and easy life, to fall in love and have amazing sex and relationships, to look perfect and make money and be popular and well-respected and admired and a total baller to the point that people part like the Red Sea when you walk into the room.

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5 Lessons on Bringing Your Dream to Life

Are u a dreamer?

“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” ~Eleanor Roosevelt

I grew up with a stepdad who was a dreamer. He lived in a world where positive affirmations created a positive life. He believed that going after your heart’s desire was as important as anything else. He lived in the clouds and in his designs and in his visions.

I used to wake up and find that he had left post-it notes on my bathroom mirror with quotes about reaching my dreams such as, “You can if you think you can,” and “Quitters never win, and winners never quit.”

He bought me a pillow speaker when I was seven, so every night I could listen to a subliminal tape repeating how I would succeed beautifully in life.

He held a vision for himself to create his own business. He invented a product to put on every street sweeper and set out to make this dream come true. He worked tirelessly at it for many years, and eventually it took off. He had done it. He was living his dream.

I would love to say that this is where the story ends. I would love to say that he lived happily ever after embracing his dream. But that just wouldn’t be the truth.

What actually happened is that my stepdad’s dream—this life that he created—began to unravel almost as quickly as it had been created. And eventually, he lost everything: his dream, his family, and his life.

(He was never the same after his business folded; his zest for life left him, and he ended up dying at 56 from unknown causes. I think that his spirit was broken and his will to live was no longer there.)

But, even though it ended so badly and sadly, he happened to pass on the dreaming torch to me. And I carry it proudly and almost defiantly.

Dreamers aren’t always revered in our society. Sometimes they are seen as flaky or irresponsible.

But growing up with a dreamer and becoming one myself, I can say without a doubt that being a dreamer allowed me to create the life I am living today. It allowed me to believe that anything is possible, and that definitely is a good thing.

I believe that carrying big dreams in our hearts and then bringing them to life is an essential part of living fully. Just because my stepdad’s dreams didn’t go as he had hoped definitely doesn’t mean that all dreams will fail.

Quite the opposite, really. I have brought many dreams to life. And I give him a lot of credit for that. During our journey together I learned some powerful life lessons about dreaming, each of which helped me hold true to my dreams:

1. Believe in yourself as much as you believe in your dream.

I have seen many beautiful dreams fail simply because the dreamer didn’t have the self-confidence to see them through. They worried that maybe it was too big of a dream. They started to feel that maybe they weren’t actually good enough to want something so amazing.

Knowing that you are worthy of your dream is an essential part of bringing it to life. Growing up with positivity and affirmations helped create a solid foundation of self-esteem for me. I don’t believe my stepdad had this self-confidence, which is one of the reasons why his dream fell apart.

2. Be okay with failing.

If you never try to reach your dreams because you’re afraid that you’ll fail, then you’ll never know for sure if you could have made them come true.

I saw my stepdad go through several “failed” versions of his product before he came up with the final one. And each time, he was even more determined to create something that held his vision. He learned from each prototype and then incorporated these changes into the final version.

He was okay with failing and with making mistakes; he knew that it was part of the process. Knowing this gave me permission to make mistakes in my own life as I’ve moved toward my dream.

I’m sure I’ll continue to make mistakes, but one thing that stays true throughout each of these so-called failures is that I am here today because of them. Each one led to a shift in my perspective and a different path, which led me to the next, and the next.

3. Keep going.

I have worked for myself for the past 10 years. And throughout that time, I have had many moments where I wondered if this entrepreneurial lifestyle was worth it. I have questioned why I took this path and asked myself if I should just get a job with the security of a regular paycheck.

But the dreamer in my heart knew that I needed to keep going. I saw my stepdad keep at it, and I knew that he eventually reached his dream by doing so. And so I kept going and stayed on course, knowing that perseverance is the way to success. Staying power and continuing on is what separates the true dreamers and the achievers from the dream hobbyists.

4. Enjoy being different.

Being a dreamer transcends the dream itself. It’s a personality trait, a lifestyle, a way of thinking and being. When you’re a dreamer, your life isn’t going to look like everyone else’s. You think differently. You act differently. You live differently. And sometimes, this can feel uncomfortable.

My stepdad was definitely an outcast—he didn’t have many friends. And while I don’t think this needs to be the case, I do think it’s important to bring friends into your life that will accept you and embrace your dreams rather than minimize or criticize them.

I love that I have created a life where I get to do pretty much whatever I want. And I love that I have brought into my life a loving community that understands me and appreciates the dreamer in me. It’s definitely possible to enjoy being different and to find a tribe who enjoys it, too.

5. Allow your dream to change.

I believe that one of the reasons my stepdad’s dream fell apart was because he was holding onto the original vision without being open to new manifestations of it. Dreams change, just like we do. But when we resist those changes, we miss out on new possibilities.

Someone offered to buy my stepdad’s company for a lot of money, but because this wasn’t part of his original dream, he wasn’t even willing to consider this possibility. Shortly after he refused this offer, his company fell apart.

While this was heartbreaking at the time, the lesson that I have taken from it is that sometimes we have to allow our dreams to change. Sometimes we have to let go of our original plan and surrender to the possibility of whatever our dream may become.

My stepdad taught me that being a dreamer is something to be embraced rather than denied.

I’m a proud dreamer who takes risks and lives my life in this space of passion and innovation. Even though his dream was never fully realized, I’m glad my stepdad was an incurable dreamer.

It allowed me to grow up with hope and faith and creativity and life. And I’m proud that I have taken this trait on and will continue reaching my own dreams. I would love for you to do the same in your own life. The world can definitely never have too many dreamers.

This article, 5 Lessons On Bringing Your Dream to Life, was originally posted here

Photo is from here